Aerie's New Lingerie Ads Are Unretouched ... and Super-Awesome

01/22/2014 at 05:38 PM ET

Aerie ad campaignCourtesy Aerie

You know how bra shopping can often be, to put it politely, the worst? Either you’re contending with bad fitting room lighting and nosy salespeople while you’re half-undressed, or your online shopping experience is spent mentally trying to transfer the bra (which looks amazing on the lingerie model) onto your own non-lingerie model body. American Eagle’s intimates line, Aerie, is aiming to change all that.

The brand just launched Aerie Real, a campaign to showcase their wares on a variety of body types and sizes. But “real” in this case doesn’t refer only to the variety of body types (one of our pet peeves is the models vs. “real women” debate — all bodies are “real!”). It refers also to the fact that the photos are unretouched, both in the ads and on their site. “The real you is sexy,” the company said in a post on the site. “We want every girl to feel good about who they are and what they look like, inside and out.”

PHOTOS: Last Night’s Look: Love It or Leave It?

Aerie ad campaignCourtesy Aerie

Another benefit of Aerie’s decision to showcase a range of bodies: You can actually see what the bras look like on women who share your cup size, up to a 40DD, which is helpful in getting a sense as to whether that strapless bra is going to work for you. And the unretouched photos mean that you get an good idea of how much “double whoa” (to use Aerie parlance) the bra will actually deliver — no wondering if that amazing cleavage was delivered via the magic of Photoshop.

Frankly, we think the photos of the girls as-is are even lovelier than your average lingerie shoot — we totally adore this initiative and hope more lingerie brands follow suit. Do you like Aerie’s new campaign? Will this make you more likely to buy lingerie online? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below!

–Alex Apatoff

FILED UNDER: BodyWatch , Lingerie , Shopping

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itsshaziaa on

Reblogged this on itsshaziaa and commented:
How awesome is this? It is great to see a brand taking initiative to show the true body as is. This stuck out to me because the demographic for Aerie is tied to American Eagle which has a teenage to young adult target. Finally, the youth can feel more comfortable and look at these Ads and relate, not be in awe of wanting “perfection.” I am so excited about this! What do you all think? Comment down below about how you feel about this and do you know other brands that are doing similar campaigns and Ads as well?

Kelli on

I’ve never shopped there before, but I will definitely be checking them out! I absolutely love this campaign!

NW Mamma on

Great Idea!! and IT’S ABOUT TIME.

KC on

I have been shopping AERIE for years – the quality is better than Vickie’s. I am not surprised at all by their new ad campaign. The brand is pretty awesome!

Heather on

This is fabulous! Its about time we stop pretending everyone should be perfect. No one is meant to be! Saw a quote today that i love. “You will never look like the girl in the magazine. The girl in the magazine doesnt even look like the girl in the magazine. Its time we stop flauntingthese fake celebrity bodies!

riva on

what in the world made the designers of the ad campaign decide to use the word “GIRL” instead of woman? Yikes! I wondered if the “girl” in the top photo was supposed to be 14. She’s a woman, not a girl. Anyway, so what, big deal…..given that 60% of U.S. residents are overweight, the campaign would have to show a lot of fat people to be “real.” And advertising has never been about showing anything that looks “real,” whether it be a car (they are always glossy and angled just right) or a person or a hamburger (food styling, anyone)? Advertising is about fantasy and promotion and spin.

Still, I really object to the word “girl.” Would a men’s underwear ad say “This boy hasn’t been altered.”?

as for “retouched,” one wonders if these women have been TOUCHED?

Ads are about what people want to look at, and people like looking at pretty people. Victoria’s Secret isn’t about to put Sidibe in its catalogs.

deliah on

It’s not about looking like the “model”…. it’s about what the lingerie looks like and how it feels. If it’s cheap, ill-fitting and scratchy……… NO SALE!

amberg on

“Super-awesome” is not an adjective, or should not be. Was that headline written by someone 19 years old? And what is “gorgeous” here? If the idea is to look “real” isn’t that headline still saying you have to look “gorgeous”? Or is it saying that everyone is “gorgeous,” which is just silly.

Katie on

I would love to see skin care/makeup lines do the same with average non-models. I have decent skin, but it isn’t super flawless. The creams they “use” on models or the makeup that promises flawless skin are easy when the canvas already has perfect flawless skin. Try it on someone with uneven skin tone, a few small pimples, and fine lines. More women might be willing to buy bras or makeup if they see non-models using it and how it really changed the skin. I don’t look at a model using makeup or a certain bra and think “Wow that’s how I will look.” This campaign is great.

Tina on

I don’t see what would need to be retouched in these pictures. They might be “real”, but they don’t look like most average women I know. They’re still fairly fit, no stretch marks on their skin, no cellulite, etc. So what? Show me truly “real” women, and I’ll be more impressed.

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